DUHAMEL

Olivier Duhamel Artist | Myriam | sculpteur résine lasercut nu orange femme | Galerie Mickaël Marciano Place des Vosges Paris

Myriam


Resin
42 x 33 x 50 cm | 16 1/2 x 13 x 19 7/10  inch
Edition of 8

Olivier Duhamel Artist | Roxie | sculpteur résine lasercut nu orange femme | Galerie Mickaël Marciano Place des Vosges Paris

Roxie 


Resin
45 cm | 17 7/10  inch
Edition of 20

Olivier Duhamel Artist | Martina | sculpteur résine lasercut nu orange femme | Galerie Mickaël Marciano Place des Vosges Paris

Medicis


Resin
50 x 44 x 32 cm | 19 7/10 x 17 3/10 x 12 3/5   inch
Edition of 5

Olivier Duhamel Artist | Martina | sculpteur résine lasercut nu orange femme |Galerie Mickaël Marciano Place des Vosges Paris

Martina 


Resin
45 x 38 x 42 cm | 17 7/10 x 15 x 16 1/2 inch
Edition of 8

Olivier Duhamel Aline | Martina | sculpteur bois lasercut nu femme | Galerie Mickaël Marciano Place des Vosges Paris

Aline 


Wood
30 x 16 x 20 cm | 11 4/5 x 6 3/10 x 7 9/10 inch
Edition of 8

Olivier Duhamel Artist | Nissan | sculpteur Bois lasercut nu femme | Galerie Mickaël Marciano Place des Vosges Paris

Nissan


Wood
50 x 24 x 12 cm | 19 7/10 x 9 2/5 x 4 7/10 inch
Edition of 5

Olivier Duhamel Artist | Rosie | sculpteur Bois lasercut nu femme | Galerie Mickaël Marciano Place des Vosges Paris

Rosie 


Wood
45 x 20 x 20 cm | 17 7/10 x 7 9/10 inch
Edition of 200

Olivier Duhamel Artist | Sandy | sculpteur bois lasercut nu femme | Galerie Mickaël Marciano Place des Vosges Paris

Sandy


Wood
40 x 44 x 40 cm | 15 7/80 x 17 3/10 x 15 7/80 inch
Edition of 8

DUHAMEL

BIOGRAPHIE

Born in France in 1957 Olivier Duhamel established himself in New Zealand in 1987. He is a figurative sculptor who is a fervent lover of human morphology. He trained artistically alongside David Reid, Chrystèle Legardinier and Jeff Koons for whom he worked at the beginning of his career.

As an ode to the curves, the art of Duhamel glorifies anatomy, which is moreover feminine. Using the glue-laminated technique, the artist sculpts and shapes in 3 dimensions using “digital clay”. He then works on laser-cutting the resin or wood plates, and finally combines them manually.

Above all, Duhamel’s artistic production is meticulous and plays with contrasts. He uses industrial materials, such as plexiglass or medium, in order to create nudes. They are as classical as they are elegant, then he confronts the rigidity of the material with the flexibility and vitality of his sculptures. Most importantly, the use of acrylic obviously increases this visual dynamism through the interaction of the medium with the light that pierces it. Depending on the angle observed, the reflections of the wood modify the appearance of the material. The curves of these women, whose aura and beauty are fully celebrated, thus come to life. 

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